Pamela Paulk

About Pamela Paulk

President Pamela Paulk oversees Johns Hopkins Medicine International’s enterprises, including developing sustainable international health collaborations with affiliates in nearly 20 countries and providing medical concierge services for thousands of international and out-of-state patients. Click here to learn more about Pamela.

Posts by Pamela Paulk:

A Story of Resounding Hope

A Story of Resounding Hope

Each year at Johns Hopkins Medicine International, we welcome about 4,500 patients who travel from all over the world, trusting us to coordinate every aspect of their care while they’re receiving treatment at Johns Hopkins. Let me share one patient’s story: Mateo was born May 14, 2014, in Mexico City after a complication-free pregnancy and(...)

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#Winning With Equality

#Winning With Equality

Women make up 79 percent of the health care workforce, but there are striking disparities at the management level. Women hold only 26 percent of hospital CEO positions and 21 percent of executive positions at Fortune 500 health care companies, according to data from Modern Healthcare. These stats are sobering, but, to me, they’re not(...)

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Pushy vs. Assertive: Why These Words Matter

Pushy vs. Assertive: Why These Words Matter

Prior to becoming president of Johns Hopkins Medicine International, I worked for 15 years in human resources, where I became highly attuned to biases in the language we use in the workplace to describe men and women. As a quick exercise, which of the words in these pairs might describe women? Pushy/Assertive. Emotional/Passionate. Abrasive/Direct. Bossy/Strong-minded.(...)

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An Unlikely Journey

An Unlikely Journey

This year’s list of the Fortune 500 leaders includes the highest number of women ever … and that number is 24. Globally, only 5 percent of the largest companies have women at the helm. My personal observation is that most organizations’ presidents are men, most are tall, many come from top-tier schools, and few are(...)

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Putting Women’s Health First

Putting Women’s Health First

Flight attendants remind us to put on our own oxygen mask before helping others with theirs. This makes sense. But as I flew back from a women’s health event recently, it struck me that this advice goes against my ingrained sense to care for others first. It isn’t always easy for women to put ourselves(...)

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Reframing Health Leadership

Reframing Health Leadership

No matter whether our organizations are in the United States or any other country around the world, we are seeing far-reaching shifts in the field of health care. Many of us are feeling the impact of rising demand and associated spending, changing demographics, aging populations, the growing prevalence of chronic diseases, increasing patient awareness and(...)

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Out Ahead

Out Ahead

Over this series of posts, we’ve covered many factors and trends that are shaping the scene in international collaborative health. This is a motivating and exciting time in our field, and one thing is certain: Health care is changing faster than ever before. Can we keep up? Or better yet, can we get ahead and(...)

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Possible Side Effects

Possible Side Effects

We know that global trends are changing clinical and preventive health care, research and development, workforce development and education. I encourage those of us in international collaborative health to discuss some of the unintended side effects we’ll encounter as our field grows more connected and complex. Here are some thoughts to get the conversation going:(...)

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Our Next New Frontier

Our Next New Frontier

Anyone who was around in the 1950s remembers how the Cold War tension between the United States and then-Soviet Union seeped into everyday life. There was the growing threat of nuclear war, conflict in Korea, and an ideological clash that played out in politics, the media and popular culture. Space became another dramatic stage for(...)

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Health Help Wanted

Health Help Wanted

We’re facing a global shortage of 17.4 million qualified health care workers—2.6 million doctors and more than 9 million nurses—according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Half of all hospitals today are operating with personnel deficits. Health care professionals’ willingness to relocate—even halfway around the world—for better career and educational opportunities is lessening some health(...)

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