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One Robot, Zero Radiation, Healing Twice as Fast

One Robot, Zero Radiation, Healing Twice as Fast

By Nicholas Theodore, M.D. If a person’s spine is unstable because of injury, degenerative disease or another cause, he or she may need spinal stabilization surgery to correct the problem. During this procedure, surgeons typically take multiple X-rays to pinpoint where to place screws to stabilize the spine. I was convinced there was a better(...)

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One-in-a-Million Diagnosis? Those Odds Don’t Faze Us.

One-in-a-Million Diagnosis? Those Odds Don’t Faze Us.

By Ali Bydon, M.D. Before he came to The Johns Hopkins Hospital for treatment in 2017, Pedro Gil, now 45, had struggled with a thoracic disk herniation for 10 years. His herniated disk had calcified, turning to bone, and it pressed on his spinal cord to produce excruciating pain, weakness, numbness and even paralysis. He(...)

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AI and Eye Health

AI and Eye Health

By Dr. T. Y. Alvin Liu Did you know the retina is actually part of the brain? It’s a direct extension of the central nervous system. So when people say eyes are the window to one’s soul, it’s perhaps not that far of a stretch after all. I’ve been interested in the retina since I(...)

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From West Point to East Baltimore

From West Point to East Baltimore

By Dr. James Ficke I have been an orthopaedic surgeon for more than two decades, but I’m also a retired U.S. Army colonel. It was my 30-year career in military medicine that instilled a passion for studying outcomes related to limb loss, limb salvage and lower-extremity trauma—conditions I saw in Mosul that I now treat(...)

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Johns Hopkins Has Made My World Bigger and My Future Brighter

Johns Hopkins Has Made My World Bigger and My Future Brighter

By Hamda Almaazmi I love experiencing new things—whether it’s finding a new hotspot for brunch in my Fells Point neighborhood, seeing my first live NFL game or my trip to Disney World earlier this summer. (Yes, I’m 27 years old, but I enjoyed it so much!) Being a research resident at Johns Hopkins has made(...)

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Three-Continent Comparison of Medical Education

Three-Continent Comparison of Medical Education

By Rebecca DiBiase   I recently completed my master’s degree in public health at the Bloomberg School of Public Health. Through the help of two projects I worked on during my master’s degree, I rediscovered a niche in the field of global health that I find particularly unique and exciting: international medical education. I initially(...)

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When Helping Could Hurt: Experiences in Global Health

When Helping Could Hurt: Experiences in Global Health

By Rebecca DiBiase   I wrote this blog post as I was flying to Peru to volunteer at a traveling medical clinic. In preparation for my trip, I read an insightful book called When Helping Hurts by Steve Corbett and Brian Fikkert that addresses the challenges and pitfalls of relief and development work in low-income(...)

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House Calls and Health Care Today

House Calls and Health Care Today

By Mary Myers Traditional hospitals today account for about a third of all medical spending—an incredible $1.1 trillion. However, during this era of consolidation across health care, we are seeing a steep decline in inpatient facilities. In fact, 20 percent fewer hospitals are operating in the United States than 35 years ago, and they are(...)

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